Monday, 30 September 2013

WE SAY - YOU MUST SUFFER

Imagine the following.

A wonderful woman in her eighties, who has had very full life is lying on her bed, she is
suffering from a particularly painful form of bone cancer. She is alert and articulate.
She has loved ones scattered far and wide. She believes in her God. She is not afraid to die.

Her doctor says " Mable, as you know you do not have much time left on this earth, in fact
with the latest technology, we can tell you will die within twenty days".

Mable Says, " Doctor I am in great pain, my family from all over the world are here to be
with me, some must leave soon. I am finished with this world, I would love to leave
peacefully with my loved ones present when I depart".

Doctor, "No, I'm sorry Mable, that is not possible, you must suffer to the end, what you or
your loved ones wish is not important, the State has decided you must suffer."

WHAT HAS PUZZULED ME THE MOST IS THIS - THOSE THAT INSIST ON
PROLONGING THE SUFFERING BEFORE ONE MEETS THEIR MAKER ARE
MOST OFTEN THE PROFESSED VERY RELIGIOUS!


The above may be a little over dramatic - however day in and day out a form of this scenario
is being played out throughout Canada.

There has been a rash of 'talking heads' on TV lately discussing 'assisted suicide'. or the right
to a personalized death, meaning the patient deciding how long she must suffer, before being
"allowed" to die.

I has for many years amazed me that individuals, governments, and their many agencies, have
for hundreds of years had the audacity to believe they should have some right to decide how
much pain, or humiliation a person MUST go thorough before being allowed to finally
                                                   rest in peace.

 Many people, (or probably most) believe that a person who is at the end of their particular life
 span is afraid of dying.

 I for instance was one.

Having reached a relatively advanced age myself, and having been close to loved ones in their last days, I now feel convinced in the vast majority of cases, that is just not true.

As one gets closer to that time to leave this life, the less the threat of death has a hold on one.

As a so called advance society, to insist a loved one, and their family, who knows death is close
must suffer unnecessarily, often for days or weeks is barbaric.

We as a society must grow up and recognize that death is inevitable, indeed it is just the natural
resolution to our wonderful, relatively short, time on this special planet.

After you or your loved on one has passed away, whether you died on the tenth of the month, or the twentieth, really makes no difference, all is over. Why should we as a society insist the time of death
must always be the one that inevitably comes with the most pain and lose of dignity?

8 comments:

  1. I can see how some one should have the right to make their own decisions in this matter. I guess there is always the fear that others will bring undue pressure on sick and elderly to make the choice a little sooner. I think there is a rash of suicides in Korea of elderly more because they are a bother to the younger generation rather then they are terminally ill. Not having crossed that bridge yet, I still am very much in the I WANT TO LIVE camp, but I can see once death is a certainty how having some say on exactly when and how could be the most reasonable thing to allow. Sandra

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    1. Yes Sandra what you point out in your excellent post is all true - and of course it is an individual decision - and like most people at your age life is the most important thing - because without it, feeling the love of new family is not possible - you are being normal. love you!

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  2. I agree Dad . I think it's called dying with dignity.
    Ken

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  3. Yes KEN - THATS THE TERM I WAS TRYING TO THINK OF.

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  4. Hi Larry,
    Given my very recent experiences with my own grandfather, this exact issue has been constantly on my mind for the past few weeks. I absolutely agree with you. The only question I had was how it feels to be on the other side, and you've just offered an answer to that.
    I always appreciate your candor!

    Ava

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  5. Ava - I am sorry to hear about your grandfather - he was a very good man. It is so very difficult to watch a person you knew and loved as strong and functioning member of society, degenerate and lose dignity in their last days. Thanks for your comments . larry

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  6. I have been thinking about this as well. As my Grandmother is very ill with Pancreatic Cancer. I feel that her spirit is lifting and that she is well not herself anymore. Who are we to say she should live another two years or more and be on so much medication that she can hardly remember what day it is and suffer through that pain. The pain of knowing you cant remember things the pain of knowing you feel like a burden ( i am not implying she is a burden, but the way she apologizes for things makes me feel her pain) I would do anything to have my grandmother live another 20 years, but i dont think i would want that if she is in so much pain and on so many drugs that she can not fully enjoy her life. so i feel i am on the fence. I think i would want her to make that choice before the illness got to intense. I agree with Sandra as some can take advantage of the situation. But if someone makes that their choice in their will then i dont think its a bad thing........ good blog Grandpa <3

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  7. Dying with dignity should be ones right.
    -kim

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